“We Shall Overcome” to be Unveiled

“We Shall Overcome” is the name of Tuck’s newest public sculpture. It will be unveiled in downtown South Bend, Indiana this Wednesday morning, June 21, 2017, at 11 AM. The double portrait sculpture commemorates an event that happened on June 21, 1964, when the University of Notre Dame’s Father Theodore Hesburgh locked arms with the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. to sing that song at a rally at Soldier Field in Chicago.

The over-lifesize sculpture will stand in the Leighton Plaza, 130 S. Main Street, across from the courthouse. The public is invited to march to the site from the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Center, 1522 Linden Ave., leaving at 10:30 AM to arrive at the site for the 11 AM unveiling ceremony. South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Rev. John Jenkins, Notre Dame’s president, Dr. Virginia Calvin, head of the African American Fund of the St. Joseph County Community Foundation, and Tuck Langland, sculptor, will each speak briefly. The ceremony will end with everyone singing We Shall Overcome.ccr02

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Best of Show in Sioux Falls SculptureWalk

Tuck Langland recently received word that he received a Best of Show award of $1,000 for his outdoor sculpture, Solitude.  It is in the SculptureWalk show in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  This outdoor exhibition continues through September 30, 2017.DSC00891

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TV Interview at Holocaust Remembrance Exhibit

Recent University of Maryland graduate, Hayley Fixler, granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, interviewed Tuck at the Midwest Museum of American Art.

http://www.abc57.com/clip/13097596/holocaust-art-exhibit-in-elkhart-serves-as-a-lesson-and-reminder

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Honoring Dr. Lester Wolfson at Indiana University South Bend

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When Lester Wolfson became chancellor of the fledgling Indiana University of South Bend campus, he hired Tuck to teach sculpture in a three-man art department. As the art department and the campus grew together, the campus became a four-year institution and began to offer degrees. Tuck was responsible for getting permission for the art department to award BA and later BFA degrees. In all his efforts, Lester Wolfson stood behind him.

Five years ago, the university wanted to celebrate Lester’s accomplishments with a portrait bust. While the university transformed a section of the auditorium vestibule into a beautifully lit setting, Tuck was creating the bust and its pedestal. Faculty members were invited to attend the bronze pour at Fire Arts in downtown South Bend, and Lester’s son, George, was asked to hold one end of the pouring shank. Months later, Lester and the Wolfson family were at the university ceremony to unveil the finished bronze. (See video, posted in this blog on June 29, 2013.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzScF4JwnrA

On Friday we received news that Lester Wolfson, age 93, has passed on. Rest in peace, Lester.

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Holocaust Remembrance Show at Midwest Museum

Tuck’s series of portrait sculptures, part of a proposed Holocaust Memorial, is part of the Holocaust Remembrance Show at the Midwest Museum of American Art in Elkhart, Indiana. Tuck conceived the memorial and created the sculptures after a moving visit to the camps in 1992. Along with the sculptures, which are part of the museum’s collection, the exhibit includes paintings by Adam and Peggy Grant. Adam’s artistic ability enabled him to survive the death camp.  After the war, he moved to the United States and settled in the Midwest. The show will be up through March 1, 2017.holcaust-remembrance-show

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Tuck Langland Retrospective Exhibition

img_2466Tuck had a retrospective exhibition at Indiana University South Bend, including eighty sculptures plus twenty-two photos of his major public sculptures.   The show was called Tuck Langland: From Art Student to Young Art Professor to Professional Sculptor.

The exhibit began in chronological order and then branched out to topical groupings. Some topics included sports figures, Africans and African Americans, post-India figures, bone china pieces, and medals. His large signature sculptures were represented by small maquettes and large photographs of the pieces in situ.

Tuck filled the gallery with some sculptures never before exhibited as well as old favorites.  Many visitors were unaware of Tuck’s abstract sculptures, which drew a lot of attention.

The show traced and explained his journey from art student to young art professor to professional sculptor. Using sculptures, and didactic signage, it illustrated how limitations and opportunities at each stage of his career shaped his choice of sculpture materials. It also explained how travel experiences and also interactions with colleagues expanded his career.

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Recognition of Tuck’s Contribution to the Cultural Life of St. Joseph County, Indiana

torchbearer, Lark.jpgTo celebrate Indiana’s 200th year of being a state, Governor Mike Pence announced a signature event, the Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay. The torch was carried 2,300 miles by renowned people from each of Indiana’s 92 counties, starting in Corydon, the first state capital, to the current capital of Indianapolis.

The torch was a working replica of the torch in the center of the state flag, and the route went past locations of natural beauty, local interest, and sites that were significant in Indiana history. The torchbearers were nominated by their peers in each county. Some walked or ran, while others utilized transport symbolic of the history and heritage of Indiana, like Indianapolis race cars, Studebakers and other cars manufactured in Indiana, horse and wagon, farm equipment, and watercraft.

In recognition of his contribution to the cultural life of St. Joseph County, Tuck was invited to ride in a Studebaker Lark, driven by the executive director of the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, from Indiana University South Bend to the University of Notre Dame.

The torches had internal cameras that could take photos of movies of important sites and people along the road – or a selfie of the torchbearer. Look online to find these movies.

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